Fake Steve versus Operawatch

Daniel at Operawatch has a go at Apple but Fake Steve Jobs hits back – in style, with a funny swipe at the old Opera 8-ish "Opera Man" ad. Not just funny, very funny.

That does it. Now I'm absolutely convinced that the fake is the real thing. Hey, watch him strike out at ANY criticism of Apple, however insignificant, watch the crazy 17-posts-today productivity. There's a lot of time, energy and passion going into that blog. Those are three things that are hard to fake.

So hey Steve, congrats on that Safari thing. Smart choice basing it on KHTML – guess Open Source developers won't sue you but just become less active and finally go away if you mess with them. I don't know anything about the background story there but sensing the disappointment from that page actually makes me glad Opera is closed source, an established company, and AFAIK employing a lawyer somewhere.

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6 thoughts on “Fake Steve versus Operawatch

  1. How did you go from discussing a blog to bashing free software?>>> guess Open Source developers won't sue youWhy would developers of KHTML sue Apple? The source code is continuously being released as required by the LGPL. If Apple were to stop developing WebKit, volunteers could pick it up and continue to work on it.>>> but just become less active and finally go away if you mess with them.I don't consider not helping to be the same as messing. If there was enough interest in OpenDarwin it would have succeeded without any help from Apple. Corporate backing isn't a requirement for open source projects to succeed.>>> makes me glad Opera is closed sourceBeing closed source will not ensure continued interest in Opera. It will not prevent Opera Software from shutting down just like the OpenDarwin project shut down. Being closed source only means that volunteers aren't able to contribute nearly as much, and that all the work put into Opera is at risk of being lost just like BeOS.Firefox isn't dying from lack of interest. Mozilla Corporation isn't filing for bankruptcy. Closed source will not keep Opera alive. It can only kill it.

  2. Even if a company goes bust, the source of their products or any other IP doesn't necessarily get lost. There are a plethora of ways to continue development and utilization, so stating otherwise I would say is FUD from people not too fond of closed-source.Just before you go ad hominem on me, I'm fond of both closed and open models, and I've contributed in many ways to open source and closed source projects.The reason I stay with Opera is that I like the quality of their products, the innovation carried out, the people working there and their continued pushing for open standards.

  3. HeroreV: it was not my intention to "bash" open source. I don't see myself saying anything about Firefox and Mozilla going away or bankrupt so I have no idea where you made that up from. I do in fact personally believe that open sourcing would be good for Opera as a product though I have no idea how it would work for Opera the company. (Note the wording of the post: "*actually* makes me glad".)I have however had the impression that Apple has taken a lot from Open Source and perhaps given a bit less back. I've read about how KHTML and Safari have diverged, for example stuff like http://www.kdedevelopers.org/node/1001http://lists.kde.org/?l=kfm-devel&m=109584767914165and while the shutdown notice from the OpenDarwin project carefully avoids putting any blame on Apple it doesn't seem Apple has gotten their relationship with the Open Source community right – far from it. They might have some work to do on that.Perhaps KHTML's licence was too liberal and let Apple get away with not contributing back in a usable form? In any case, I was implying a criticism of Apple and don't understand why you thought otherwise.

  4. >>> Even if a company goes bust, the source of their products or any other IP doesn't necessarily get lost.As long as something is closed source, it's *at risk* of being lost. Not that it will, just that it's possible.>>> The reason I stay with Opera is that I like the quality of their products, the innovation carried out, the people working there and their continued pushing for open standards.That was actually my point. The reason people like Opera isn't because it's closed source; they liked it for other reasons.>>> it was not my intention to "bash" open source.Please excuse me if I misunderstood you.>>> I don't see myself saying anything about Firefox and Mozilla going away or bankrupt so I have no idea where you made that up from.I was just using Firefox/Mozilla as an example of a successful open source project.>>> Perhaps KHTML's licence was too liberal and let Apple get away with not contributing back in a usable form?The purpose of a copyleft licencse isn't to ensure that changes can be easily incorporated back into the original project. It's okay for a fork to become so different from the original that changes can't be merged back. It would be entirely against the ideals of free software to say, "You can modify it, but only if you keep it close enough to the original that we can use your changes."What's important is that the fork can always be continued and improved, and is never lost. The LGPL ensures that when Apple stops supporting WebKit, other people can continue working on it.>>> In any case, I was implying a criticism of Apple and don't understand why you thought otherwise.You seemed to be implying that open source doesn't work, and that OpenDarwin failed because it was open source. When you said, "sensing the disappointment from that page actually makes me glad Opera is closed source", you seemed to be saying that being closed source would prevent Opera from having the same fate as OpenDarwin.

  5. OK, I see where I was unclear. I should have spelled out my thoughts in more detail so thanks for responding 😉

  6. (BTW I now think FSJ is an ingenious move from Apple's marketing people. They achieve a lot of buzz in the blogosphere and can strike out at anti-Apple criticism with non-marketing credibility.)

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