JPMC bank shares the browser blocking love

I'm going to just link to the JP Morgan Chase bank dropping support for some browsers forum post without comment.

Except for this: :doh:

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24 thoughts on “JPMC bank shares the browser blocking love

  1. Anonim writes:thats the price Opera pays for YEARS long period of ignoring webdevelopers.I know, that this is not entirely relevant, but how Opera expects webdevelopers to solve complex bug without webdeveloper tools worth mentioning?Dragonfly – with all due respect – is a crap. It's development is stagnant and it goes deeper and deeper into a flawed solution (Javascript debuging Javascript, slow, TERRIBLE^TERRIBLE interface). Opera is a marginal player on the desktop and it is not going to change unless people start finding their pages 'just working in opera' and that wont happen until developer tools are here.Compare pace of safari/chrome/webkit developer' tools developmen, firebug one and dragofly's. what can you see? that webkit tools took two years to be extendable masterpiece, while opera is still around finetuning licence issues.Get. To. Work. Now. [dragonfly team]if not, opera will slowly die. because neat features (most of them outdated and not updated for years..) and great UI are worthless when a browser cannot be used to browse a web.

  2. Originally posted by anonymous:

    if not, opera will slowly die

    Yawn.Losers like you have been predicting Opera's demise for more than 15 years. And somehow, Opera has just grown and grown and grown. It's even the dominant mobile browser.But hey, keep being ignorant!BTW, Dragonfly kicks Firebug's ass. And Firebug itself uses XUL, JavaScript, etc., so you are clearly insanely ignorant about these things.

  3. Anonim writes:prd3?please, dont interfere when adults talkCharles:given how big Chase is, I doubt that people that decided to drop chrome/opera even KNOW about people that decided to invest in Opera. thats the way corpos work. nothing strange here.

  4. Originally posted by anonymous:

    Charles:given how big Chase is, I doubt that people that decided to drop chrome/opera even KNOW about people that decided to invest in Opera

    It is the parent company of Chase that has the investmentOriginally posted by anonymous:

    given how big Chase is

    Just like Microsoft…

  5. Originally posted by anonymous:

    please, dont interfere when adults talk

    You wouldn't know what adults talk about if you were smacked over the head with it repeatedly.Changing the subject, lying, ignoring the facts… All in a day's work for an obsessive troll.Fail.

  6. Originally posted by anonymous:

    I doubt that people that decided to drop chrome/opera even KNOW about people that decided to invest in Opera. thats the way corpos work. nothing strange here.

    Indeed. It's still funny in a darkly ironic way. The people managing Chase's share holdings should explain the people managing Chase's web site a few things, for example that Opera actually pays them a dividend and it might decrease if Opera users are forced to change browsers. But they need to proceed carefully, because since blocking Opera is harming their business interests Chase might end up having to sue themselves :-p

  7. Originally posted by hallvors:

    Opera is harming their business interests Chase might end up having to sue themselves :-p

    How would that work and who would win :p

  8. Originally posted by Chas4:

    Originally posted by hallvors:

    pera is harming their business interests Chase might end up having to sue themselves :-p

    How would that work and who would win

    Whoever wins, they lose 😛

  9. Garrett writes:The reasons given on their page was for security. Immediately following that is a list of browsers that have security issues that have been fixed. * Internet Explorer® 6.0 and higher * Firefox® 2.0 and higher * Safari® 3.0 and higher (for Mac systems only)Then they mention reasons "There are two primary reasonsâsecurity and popularity."Is security at all an issue?Is Internet Explorer 6's Zone based security effective? At what level? Even with ActiveX enabled? Are the security issues that they faced too secretive to mention? How do they think User-Agent sniffing determines a more secure experience? Obviously any Opera user can change the User-Agent to "mask as IE" and so in that case, how do they think it is more secure? And is it equally secure to IE6? I'd certainly hope not — for Opera's sake, that would be a disaster. Of course a change to the user-agent string does not affect the Brower's security. Putting up a web page that hand-waves over their inability seems shameful, but to customers who don't understand front end engineering so well, there may be doubt that there is some security flaws on Opera.Most bank sites are awful and if you use it, you may likely find actual security holes. I'm a little familiar with http://wellsfargo.com, which also uses browser detection to try to determine security level. http://www.wellsfargo.com/help/wfonline/browser_supportedI've discussed this problem with a WF developer. His response was that UA sniffing is the correct and only way to determine if 128 bit encryption is supported. Obviously sending 128 bit encrypted data to the client and seeing if it is decrypted can't work. It's too obvious or something.Wellsfargo.com allows user names and passwords to be entered case-insensitively. That means if your password is HalRM123, you can type halrm123 and it will work. When I mentioned it to the WF developer, he acted as if he was not even aware of that. That was two years ago and they've not changed it at all.I've not worked in a bank, but I have had friends who have and I have interviewed and from what I've heard from everyone is that corporate bank has a lot of red tape and process obstacles that get in the way of getting things done. Such a stifling workplace scenario, coupled with below market pay, turns good developers away. The result is not so good developers working in a development process that is so hobbling that just achieving the trivial — such as getting the site to work in a few browsers — becomes to appear as a major hurdle.

  10. Garrett writes:That last comment formatted badly, didn't it? It seems no HTML code is allowed and line breaks are removed.

  11. Garrett writes:Large image of the above is at:http://files.myopera.com/Chas4/albums/540739/wells%20fargo%20epic%20fail.png———————————————————–WF's "Please Use a Supported Browser" page lists IE for Windows, Firefox, and Safari for Mac and Windows. They don't even do a very good job at identifying the user's browser in default configuration with an unchanged user-agent, do they? If that is the groundwork for WF web security (and it is, I've confirmed with WF developers in person), how do you feel about banking online?

  12. Originally posted by prd3:

    BTW, Dragonfly kicks Firebug's ass.

    Care to provide any details? I'm interested to know how it's so much better from your perspective. Feel free to post in the forums or anywhere and provide a link.

  13. Anonymous writes:@fearphage – dont count on it. prd3, previously purdi, nelson and so many other names banned by opera staff can only bark, always in the same way. he knows nothing, understand nothing, but sure knows how to troll

  14. Anonymous writes:I would say, that I'll hold you accountable, but I've already lost faith in Dragonfly development. The pace Webkit tools are now developing is amazing, Firebug is still incredibly ahead of everyone else, and Microsoft managed to 'people-ize' Visual Studio hooks into Internet Explorer. It took two years for Webkit' tools to evolve from utter crap, to something that is second to Firebug and rapidly catching up. In the same two years.. Dragonfly is still where it was. Reading trough DF forums is a depressing thing (10 users, almost no new posts), same as DF Blog (no functionality, everything is 'we are working on that', 'we are planning on adding it etc'). Looking at GitHub commit list, it is clear, that one person is working on it, and it is a part time assignment. This is the _wrong_ way to play catch up.

  15. Originally posted by anonymous:

    Looking at GitHub commit list, it is clear, that one person is working on it, and it is a part time assignment. This is the _wrong_ way to play catch up.

    That's the UI part. The core parts and the API core exposes to Dragonfly needed more work, which has taken up quite a lot of development time. When that's done, adding the new features incrementally to the UI can be done quite quickly, I hope. I'd like development to happen faster too (but same applies to a lot of other features and bug fixes :-p)

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